Index Changes

Open ESB v2 Release Info

Open ESB v2 Release Notes

Application Server and NetBeans IDE Release Notes

In addition to these release notes, you might also want to consult the following release notes:

Components Provided With Open ESB v2

Open ESB supports pluggable service engines and communication protocol bindings, as well as dynamic, configurable message management and delivery. Open ESB includes the JBI Runtime and the service engines and binding components listed below. Developers can also create additional plug-in components to fit specific integration tasks.

All JBI components are initially installed in the shutdown state. When a service assembly is deployed to a component, the component automatically transitions to the started state.

Service Engines Provided With Open ESB v2

Component Name Description
BPEL Service Engine sun-bpel-engine Provides services for executing Web Services Business Process Execution Language 2.0 (WS-BPEL, or BPEL) compliant business processes.
Java EE Service Engine sun-javaee-engine Connects Java EE web services to JBI components.
SQL Service Engine sun-sql-engine Provides SQL execution services to other JBI components.
XSLT Service Engine sun-xslt-engine Transforms XML documents using XSL style sheets.

Binding Components Provided With Open ESB v2

Component Name Description
File Binding Component sun-file-binding Provides a transport service to a file system and offers a comprehensive solution to interact with the file system from the JBI environment.
HTTP Binding Component sun-http-binding Provides external connectivity for SOAP over HTTP in a JBI 1.0 compliant environment.
JMS Binding Component sun-jms-binding Provides Java Message Service (JMS) transport for inbound and outbound messages.

Technical Requirements

Open ESB v2 runs within Sun Java System Application Server 9.1 Update 2. Refer to the Sun Java System Application Server 9.1 Update 1-9.1 Update 2 Release Notes for information on technical requirements and supported platforms.
Open ESB v2 requires Java 2 Platform Standard Edition 5.0 (J2SE 5.0) or Java 2 Platform Standard Edition 6.0 (J2SE 6.0).

JBI File Layout Within the Application Server

JBI Installation Root Directory

The JBI installation root directory is created by the installer. This directory contains static content that is shared across all instances in an application server installation. There is only one JBI installation root directory per application server installation.

<as_install_dir>
   /jbi
      /bin
      /components
      /doc
      /lib
      /schemas
      /shared-libraries

JBI Domain Root Directory

The JBI domain root directory is created by the application server at domain-creation time. This directory serves as a configuration and artifact repository for all instances in a domain.

<as_domain_dir>
   /jbi
      /autoinstall
      /components
      /config
      /service-assemblies
      /shared-libraries

JBI Instance Root Directory

The JBI instance root directory is created by the application server administration runtime at instance-creation time. This directory serves as a local repository for configuration and artifacts specific to an instance.

<as_instance_dir>
   /jbi
      /components
      /config
      /service-assemblies
      /shared-libraries

JBI Administration

Open ESB provides several administration tools and utilities for administering composite applications.

JBI Ant Tasks

JBI Ant tasks are integrated into the Sun Java System Application Server Ant client, asant. Note the following changes in Ant administration:

  • JBI Ant task definitions have been added to the default task definition file (defaults.properties) in sun-appserv-ant.jar. You do not need to explicitly include a taskdef for JBI Ant tasks when executing scripts with asant.
  • JBI Ant task implementation classes have been added to the classpath of the asant script. You do not need to explicitly include jbi-ant-tasks.jar in the classpath when executing scripts with asant.

The following tasks have been added in this release:

  • jbi-set-runtime-loggers
  • jbi-list-runtime-loggers

  • jbi-set-component-loggers
  • jbi-list-component-loggers

  • jbi-set-runtime-configuration
  • jbi-list-runtime-configuration

  • jbi-set-component-configuration
  • jbi-list-component-configuration

  • jbi-create-application-configuration
  • jbi-update-application-configuration
  • jbi-list-application-configurations
  • jbi-delete-application-configurations

  • jbi-create-application-variables
  • jbi-update-application-variables
  • jbi-list-application-variables
  • jbi-delete-application-variables

  • jbi-list-statistics

  • jbi-verify-application-environment
  • jbi-export-application-environment

These tasks are not included in the default task definitions in the asant environment. You need to load the JBI task definitions explicitly in the Ant script in the asant environment in order to use these tasks in the Ant script. To load the task definitions for these tasks, use the following in the Ant script before using these tasks:

<taskdef resource="com/sun/jbi/ui/ant/antlib.xml" />

For more information, see the JBI Ant Task Reference. You can find this reference in the following location in an Open ESB v2 installation: <App_Server_Install_Dir>/jbi/doc/antdoc/

JBI Ant Targets

The following targets have been added in this release:

  • set-runtime-logger
  • list-runtime-loggers

  • set-component-logger
  • list-component-loggers

  • set-runtime-configuration
  • list-runtime-configuration

  • set-component-configuration
  • list-component-configuration

  • create-application-configuration
  • update-application-configuration
  • list-application-configurations
  • delete-application-configuration

  • create-application-variable
  • update-application-variable
  • list-application-variables
  • delete-application-variable

  • list-all-statistics
  • list-endpoint-statistics
  • list-service-assembly-statistics
  • list-component-statistics
  • list-nmr-statistics
  • list-framework-statistics

  • verify-application-environment
  • export-application-environment

For more information, see the JBI Ant Target Reference. You can find this reference in the following location in an Open ESB v2 installation: <App_Server_Install_Dir>/jbi/doc/antdoc/

Command Line Interface (asadmin)

Sun Java System Application Server's command-line administration utility, asadmin, includes JBI commands. Detailed help for each JBI command is available in man-page format through the asadmin help command.

The following JBI commands have been added in this release:

  • set-jbi-runtime-logger
  • set-jbi-component-logger
  • set-jbi-runtime-configuration
  • set-jbi-component-configuration

  • update-jbi-application-configuration
  • update-jbi-application-variable

  • create-jbi-application-configuration
  • create-jbi-application-variable

  • delete-jbi-application-configuration
  • delete-jbi-application-variable

  • list-jbi-application-configurations
  • list-jbi-application-variables

  • show-jbi-runtime-loggers
  • show-jbi-runtime-configuration
  • show-jbi-application-configuration
  • show-jbi-statistics

  • verify-jbi-application-environment
  • export-jbi-application-environment

Admin Console Interface for JBI Administration

The Sun Java System Application Server Admin Console provides JBI administration controls in the following areas:

  • A Deploy JBI Service Assembly task appears in the Common Tasks page (the initial Admin Console page).
  • A JBI node appears in the tree view in the left frame of the Admin Console.
  • A component management screen enables you to install, uninstall, configure, view, and control the lifecycle of JBI components.
  • A shared library management screen enables you to install, uninstall, and view JBI shared libraries.
  • A service assembly management screen enables you to deploy, undeploy, view, and control the lifecycle of JBI service assemblies.

NetBeans IDE Administration Features

NetBeans IDE 6.1 provides the following JBI administration tools:

  • JBI Manager
    You invoke the JBI Manager from the Services window in the NetBeans IDE. Right-click a binding component or service engine to view the administration options.
  • Composite Application Service Assembly (CASA) Editor
    Provides a high-level view of a composite application, allowing you to interactively specify service endpoints and configurations. You invoke the CASA Editor from the Projects window in the NetBeans IDE. Right-click a composite application project and select Edit Application Configuration.

Reporting Bugs

We welcome your input on any issues that you find with Open ESB.

Core Open ESB Runtime and Open ESB Components Issues

For issues with the core Open ESB runtime or with Open ESB components, go to:

https://open-esb.dev.java.net/IssueTracker.html

To use the Open ESB issue tracker, you must be a member of the Open ESB project .
You can view issues that have been previously reported at https://open-esb.dev.java.net/issues/query.cgi .

Java EE Service Engine Issues

For issues with the Java EE Service Engine, go to:

https://glassfish.dev.java.net/servlets/ProjectIssues

Known Issues and Limitations

This section describes known issues and limitations with Open ESB v2.

You might also want to consult the following release notes for known issues:

Open ESB Component Limitations

The File Binding Component supports both Request-Response and One-Way message exchanges on the inbound side, but only supports One-Way operations on the outbound side.

The HTTP Binding Component cannot accept connections through a firewall. As a workaround, configure the Java properties proxyHost and proxyPort from the Administration Console of the application server. To do this, click the Application Server node in the tree, and the JVM Settings and JVM Options tabs in the right pane. Then add the following JVM options:

    -Dhttp.proxyHost=myProxyServer.com
    -Dhttp.proxyPort=80</code>
The proxy might also require authentication/authorization.

The HTTP Binding Component does not have this feature (setting the HTTP property, Proxy-Authorization, with a base 64 encoded username:password) in this release.

List of Known Issues

ID Description / Workaround
6522692 Java EE Service Engine cannot act as both a service provider and service consumer to the same BPEL process.
In a BPEL process, you cannot make a one-way invocation to the Java EE Service Engine and also have a correlated receive activity expecting an inbound message exchange from the same Java EE Service Engine to the same BPEL process.
Workaround: Model your scenario as an InOut Message exchange (request-response invocation from the BPEL Service Engine to the Java EE Service Engine).
6504443 SQL Service Engine requires third party driver to interoperate with Oracle's classes12.zip.
Oracle does not implement the metadata calls that are used to generate the WSDL files, thus a third party driver such as that supplied by DataDirect must be used.
Workaround: None.
96020 WSDL files generated by the SQL Project module do not correctly identify parameter names.
When using the SQL Project and generating Insert, Update, and Delete the parameter names are not generated correctly. For example, instead of generating parameter names matching the column names for the select statement, it creates parameters named param1, param2, param3, and so forth.
Workaround: None.
6469537 No warning is given when shutting down a component that has running service units.
Workaround: Before shutting down a component, make sure all service assemblies with service units deployed to that component are stopped and shut down. This is to avoid other services attempting to access services that will no longer be available because of the component shutdown.

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This page (revision-1) was last changed on 22-Oct-08 21:40 PM, -0700 by MarkWhite